Figure 16: 2 Ton That Tung Street, 2015 (gần phía trước nhà thờ Huyện Sĩ)

Blogs

Figure 16: 2 Ton That Tung Street, 2015 (gần phía trước nhà thờ Huyện Sĩ)
journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-16.jpg

31

Continuing our survey of Ho Chi Minh City, a building (fig. 16) at 2 Ton That Tung not only has rounded corners but appears almost as a spherical tower. Its numerous awning windows in various sizes, along with concrete awnings, form a significant design component, and on the concrete façade is a pattern of rectangles. On the top floor, the interior section is receded and surrounded by balconies with thin columns. Such thin columns are similar to those visible on the top floors of numerous buildings of the city, including bank buildings and the Catinat building discussed above. Finally, a building on Nguyen Hue Boulevard currently housing Saigontourist, next to the Artex building, is notable for a repeated pattern of triple horizontal white bands and playful vertical decorative textures.

—————–

Recent Buildings With Rounded Corners
journals.openedition.org/abe/3630#ftn32

32

In central Ho Chi Minh City, on Dong Khoi and nearby streets, are a number of recently built high-rises that also feature rounded corners. The seven-story Huong Sen Hotel at 66–70 Dong Khoi Street which opened in 1993 and renovated in 2012, also has a rounded corner along all floors, at Dong Khoi and Mac Thi Buoi streets. Parkson Saigontourist Plaza at 35 bis–45 Le Thanh Ton Street, at the intersection with Dong Khoi Street, also has a curved corner all along the six-story façade. The Sheraton Hotel, built in 2003 next to the Caravelle Hotel, includes several narrow, curved corners, two of them on upper floors only. The prominently curved corner of the Artex building completed in 2007,42 at 161 Dong Khoi Street across the street from the Caravelle Hotel, is topped with a dome, which echoes the tower-like shape and the dome of the Grand Hotel several blocks further south. At Lamson Square near the Municipal Theater, the five-star Park Hyatt Hotel, which opened in 2005, not only features a wide curved angle but significantly resembles the nearby landmark Hotel Continental in its overall design and white color. Vincom Center A (2012), built on the site of the Eden building across the street from the Hotel Continental, similarly emulates the design of the Hotel Continental and also showcases a rounded corner. Even the latest symbol of financial and architectural modernity, the Bitexco Financial Tower, completed in 2010 and inspired by a lotus flower according to its architect Carlos Zapata,43 seems to pay a certain tribute to the salient and unique architectural heritage of Ho Chi Minh City, in its curved shape. This extends to the semicircular helipad.

————-
Notes:
42 “Khởi công xây dựng Cao ốc Artex Saigon,” SGGP official website, 26 May 2005, URL: www.sggp. (…)
43 “Colliers International chosen to manage tallest building in town,” Vietnam Breaking News, 25 Octob (…)

——————————————–

Disappearing Architectural Legacy: Aesthetic and Psychological Impact of Development

33

In the last two decades, Ho Chi Minh City, the economic dynamo of Vietnam, has been undergoing dramatic changes in its urbanscape, and much of this development comes at a steep price: the loss and destruction of much of what makes the city unique in the first place. More than half of heritage buildings were destroyed or significantly altered in the space of a decade, between 1993 and 2014. Of 377 structures in districts 1 and 3 categorized as heritage sites by French and Vietnamese specialists in 1993, at least 207 have been demolished or defaced, according to Fanny Quertamp Nguyen, director of the Center for Prospective and Urban Studies (PADDI), a Franco-Vietnamese urban research agency.44 Three of the most prominent losses have been the 213 Dong Khoi Art Deco building, the Eden, and the Tax Trade center all discussed above. The demolition of the building at 213 Dong Khoi in 2014 galvanized the Vietnamese public to start a community-led urban heritage conservation movement. The demolition plan of the Tax Trade Center was widely criticized by the public, who wished to conserve the building not only for aesthetic reasons but in order to protect their collective urban memories. Residents see razing or overhauling such buildings as resulting in the ripping of the social fabric.45 Rapid changes in the urban environment result not only in the loss of architectural, cultural, and historical heritage, but also profoundly impact residents’ psychology. Collective and individual memories of the urban environment play a significant role in the structuring of daily routines and the conception of what constitutes a viable urban life.

34

Moreover, the loss of architectural heritage signifies the loss of a pattern of dialogue among generations of architects, builders, and residents. It is clear that in Ho Chi Minh City generations of architects across colonial and postcolonial periods were clearly inspired by existing architecture of the city. Such influence is discernible from the material evidence of the buildings themselves. Wandering in central Ho Chi Minh City on foot, one begins to see rounded, curved corners everywhere. The most striking heritage in this regard dates from the period between the 1920s and 1960s. In addition to curved corners, tall ceilings and louvered windows, other recurring architectural motifs indicate such patterns of dialogue. A good example is the frequent use of thin columns and receded top floors with space for balconies on top floors of numerous buildings of the city, including bank buildings and the Catinat building, dating from the 1920s through the 1960s. While the design of extra exterior space was clearly motivated by practical purposes of lessening the effects of heat on top floors, the recurring motifs form an intriguing pattern and in turn an architectural and cultural heritage. Another repeated element is thin bands of horizontal slits. Again, it is clear that architects and builders were inspired by existing designs of the city and nearby cities such as Phnom Penh. Such a pattern showcases the resilience of architectural forms in the city—and the region—even as changing stylistic trends caused multiple metamorphoses of forms.

35

It is difficult to replicate an architectural coherence achieved during a particular period. New structures replacing demolished ones are, while no doubt luxurious, clean, and modern, invariably lack the singular cohesiveness attained in a particular space and time. Rather, the new structures are products of a global postmodernist age that can be found in any number of cities. In this regard the Bitexco Financial Tower is one of the few recently constructed buildings in central Ho Chi Minh City that stands out as being notably innovative and well designed. In this way, the new high-rises fail to replace the architectural designs of the more modest but finely designed bygone structures. As such, the architectural emulation that some of the brand-new buildings display in the form of curved corners function mostly at a perfunctory, symbolic level. From the perspective of tourism as well, the loss of urban and architectural heritage is rapidly turning Ho Chi Minh City into yet another Asian city characterized by skyscrapers without much historical memory or charm, the characteristics that precisely distinguish Ho Chi Minh City, as well as Hanoi, from numerous Asian cities with more developed economies. Ho Chi Minh City possesses a very distinct architectural heritage, notable for a diversity of styles but also marked by a large, cohesive set of modernist architecture, and this heritage needs to be preserved.

————–
Notes:
44 “Vietnam metro loses 200 historic buildings to development,” Thanh Nien News, 12 April 2014, http:/ (…)
45 Mike Ives, “Colonial Architecture Fades from Ho Chi Minh City,” op. cit. (note 29); Zanna K. McKay, (…)

———————————————

Notes

1 Thierry Delfosse, Saigon Modernist: Fifty years of Architecture, an e-book (2017), is the only monograph to focus on this topic. While it contains reproductions of archival material such as building plans, the text is short and mostly descriptive. Lê Quang Ninh and Stéphane Dovert (eds.), Saigon 1698-1998: Kiến trúc/Architectures, Quy hoạch/Urbanisme, Ho Chi Minh City: Nhà xuất bản Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh, 1998, and Tim Doling, Exploring Ho Chi Minh City, Hà Nội: Thế Giới Publishers, 2014, include discussion of modernist buildings. Given the dearth of scholarly work, the most vibrant discussion of modernist architecture in the city can be found on websites: HistoricVietnam.com and Saigoneer.com are the best online sources on modernist buildings. On colonial architecture of Ho Chi Minh City see Arnauld Le Brusq, Vietnam à travers l’architecture coloniale, Paris: Éditions Patrimoines et Médias; Éditions de l’Amateur, 1999; Caroline Herbelin, Architectures du Vietnam colonial: repenser le métissage, Paris: CTHS; INHA, 2016 (L’Art et l’essai); and Gwendolyn Wright, The Politics of Design in French Colonial Urbanism, London; Chicago, IL: University Of Chicago Press, 1991.

2 The 1946–1954 period, during the First Indochina War, saw a large migration of the rural population into Saigon, fleeing frequent French military campaigns against the Vietminh and also against Cao Dai and Hoa Hao. After the emergence of two independent states divided by the 17th parallel in 1954, throughout the Vietnam War (the Second Indochina War), the city’s population continue to grow. It grew between 1954 and 1964 from 1.7 to 2.4 million, and alongside the influx of American military, migration into the city of populations seeking refuge from the war continued so that by 1975, when the war ended, it had reached 4 million. Natasha Pairaudeau and François Tainturier, “De Saigon à Ho Chi Minh Ville: croissance et changements depuis 1945,” in Lê Quang Ninh and Stéphane Dovert (eds.), Saigon 1698-1998, op. cit. (note 1); Quach Thanh Tam-Langlet, “Saïgon, capitale de la République du Sud-Viêtnam (1954–1975) ou une urbanisation sauvage,” in Pierre-Bernard Lafont (ed.), Péninsule indochinoise, études urbaines, Paris: L’Harmattan, 1991 (Recherches asiatiques. Travaux du Centre d’histoire et de civilisations de la Péninsule indochinoise), p. 190.

3 Mel Schenck, “How Vietnam Created Its Own Brand of Modernist Architecture,” Saigoneer, 28 December 2016, URL: saigoneer.com/saigon-development/8939-how-vietnam-created…. Accessed 17 July 2017. Schenck is writing a book arguing that the Vietnamese embraced modernism in a way that is unique in the world. Much of this modernist architecture has subsequently been demolished, altered, or blocked from view.

4 Vũ Hùng Việt, “Preface,” in Lê Quang Ninh and Stéphane Dovert (eds.), Saigon 1698-1998, op. cit. (note 1), p. 9.

5 Trương Ngọc Lân, “Die Geschichte der Modernen Architektur in Vietnam,” ARCH+, no. 226, Autumn 2016, p. 27–29.

6 “Les immeubles Art Déco du cours Jean Jaurès à Grenoble,” architecture-art-deco.fr, 20 January 2016, URL: www.architecture-art-deco.fr/les-immeubles-art-deco-cours…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

7 In Singapore numerous curved buildings in the Streamline Moderne style were built in the 1930s in the Tioing Bahru neighborhood, which is currently enjoying a renewed vogue as a significant heritage area.

8 Books devoted to the topic of curved façades or corners are rare. References to such themes are scattered in works such as Stanislaus von Moos, Le Corbusier: Elements of a Synthesis, Cambridge, MA; London: MIT Press, 1979. Works discussing Streamline Moderne style such as Anthony Sutcliffe, London: An Architectural History, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2006, and Anthony Sutcliffe, Paris: An Architectural History, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1993, do not mention the broader circulation of styles beyond Europe and the United States.

9 On modern architecture in Tel Aviv see Nitza Metzger-Szmuk, Des maisons sur le sable : Tel-Aviv, Mouvement moderne et esprit Bauhaus = Dwelling on the Dunes, Tel-Aviv: Modern movement and Bauhaus ideals [Véra Pinto-Lasry and Vivianne Barsky trans.], Paris: Éditions de l’Éclat, 2004; Nahoum Cohen, Bauhaus Tel Aviv: An Architectural Guide, London: Batsford Ltd, 2003; Günther Förg, Photographs: Bauhaus Tel Aviv – Jerusalem, exhibition catalogue (Weimar, Schillermuseum, 15 February–14 April 2002; Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, November–December 2002), Ostfildern-Ruit: Hatje Cantz, 2002; Sharon Rotbard, White City, Black City: Architecture and War in Tel Aviv and Jaffa, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2015.

10 For some examples of such houses see Adrian Tinniswood, The Art Deco House, New York, NY: Watson-Guptill, 2002. Such buildings can be seen in Vietnam and Cambodia as well; La Résidence Hotel of Hue, originally built in 1930 as an annex of the Resident Superior of Annam, is an example. A photograph of this building circa 1940 is in Arnauld Le Brusq, Vietnam à travers l’architecture coloniale, op. cit. (note 1), p. 133.

11 “Cochinchine,” L’Illustration, 23 April 1864, p. 267–268.

12 Arnauld Le Brusq, Vietnam à travers l’architecture coloniale, op. cit. (note 1), p. 39.

13 On the urban planning of colonial Saigon see Gwendolyn Wright, The Politics of Design in French Colonial Urbanism, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1991 (Architectural history, Urban history); Ambe J. Njoh, French Urbanism in Foreign Lands, Cham: Springer, 2016 [Ebook]; Caroline Herbelin, Architectures du Vietnam colonial, op. cit. (note 1); and Philippe Franchini (ed.), Saigon 1925-1945: De la “Belle Colonie” à l’éclosion révolutionnaire ou la fin des dieux blancs, Paris: Éditions Autrement, 1993 (Mémoires, 17).

14 Mark Bowyer, “A bland future for Saigon’s main street?” Thanh Nien News, 10 July, 2014, URL: www.thanhniennews.com/commentaries/a-bland-future-for-sai…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

15 Tim Doling, “A Date with the Wrecking Ball: The Catinat Building,” The Saigoneer, 23 June, 2014, URL: saigoneer.com/saigon-buildings/2180-a-date-with-the-wreck…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

16 Brian Letwin and Tim Doling, “Nearly Gone But Not Forgotten: 213 Dong Khoi,” May 12, 2014, URL: saigoneer.com/saigon-development/1940-nearly-gone-but-not…. Accessed 7 February 2015.

17 Brian Letwin and Tim Doling, “Nearly Gone But Not Forgotten,” op. cit. (note 16).

18 Minh Ngọc, “Vincom Center A – ‘viên ngọc’ giữa lòng TP.HCM,” Vietnamnet, 23 October 2012, URL: vietnamnet.vn/vn/kinh-doanh/vincom-center-a-vien-ngoc-giu…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

19 Helen Clark, “The fall of Saigon—by demolition,” Independent, 11 January 2011, URL: www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/the-fall-of-saigon-…. Accessed 17 July 2013.

20 Dang Bui, “The Cinemas of Old Saigon,” The Saigoneer, 4 September 2014, URL: saigoneer.com/saigon-buildings/2630-the-cinemas-of-old-sa…. Accessed 17 July 2015. Matt Gross, “Footsteps: Marguerite Duras’s ‘The Lover’; In Vietnam, Forbidden Love and Literature,” The New York Times, 30 April 2006, URL: www.nytimes.com/2006/04/30/travel/30footstep.html?pagewan…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

21 François Tainturier, “Architectures et urbanisme sous l’administration française,” in Lê Quang Ninh and Stéphane Dovert (eds.), Saigon 1698-1998, op. cit. (note 1), p. 189.

22 Le Brusq cites the Printemps department store of Paris and the Negresco Hotel of Nice as influences on the dome. Arnauld Le Brusq, Vietnam à travers l’architecture coloniale, op. cit. (note 1), p. 96.

23 François Tainturier, “Architectures et urbanisme,” op. cit. (note 21), p. 187.

24 Ibid., p. 187.

25 “Memory lane: More than a century of Dong Khoi, icon of Saigon beauty,” Thanh Nien News, 4 May 2015, URL: www.thanhniennews.com/travel/memory-lane-more-than-a-cent…. Accessed 17 July 2017. The hotel had 99 rooms at the time. François Tainturier, “Architectures et urbanisme,” op. cit. (note 21), p. 187.

26 François Tainturier, “Architectures et urbanisme,” op. cit. (note 21), p. 187.

27 Đào Loan, “Mở rộng Majestic,” Thời báo Kinh tế Sài gòn, June 7, 2011, URL: www.thesaigontimes.vn/Home/doanhnghiep/motvongdoanhnghiep…. Accessed 7 April 2017.

28 “Ho Chi Minh City commences demolition of Saigon Tax Trade Center,” Tuoi Tre News, 12 October 2016, URL: tuoitrenews.vn/business/37504/ho-chi-minh-city-commences-…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

29 Mike Ives, “Colonial Architecture Fades From Ho Chi Minh City, and Residents Mourn,” The New York Times, 25 February 2016, URL: www.nytimes.com/2016/02/26/world/asia/vietnam-ho-chi-minh…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

30 Trần Thị Vĩnh Tường, “The Saigon Tax Trade Center Mosaic Staircase: A Forgotten Moroccan Masterpiece,” 21 July 2015, URL: saigoneer.com/saigon-buildings/4875-the-saigon-tax-trade-…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

31 Arnauld Le Brusq, Vietnam à travers l’architecture coloniale, op. cit. (note 1), p. 93−94, 96. The interior is colorfully decorated with Khmer motifs.

32 Nguyễn Văn Hảo’s descendants still live in a section of the building, while shops are located on the ground floor. Tim Doling, Exploring Ho Chi Minh City, op. cit. (note 1), p. 115.

33 “Échos et nouvelle,” Le Nouvelliste d’Indochine, 18 December 1938, cited in “Clinique Saint-Paul, Rue Legrand-De-La-Liraye, Saïgon (1938–1975),” URL:

www.entreprises-coloniales.fr/inde-indochine/Clinique_Ang…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

34 Service de Santé de Hô Chi Minh Ville, “Hôpital Tu Du,” tudu.com.vn/cache/1043260_Hôpital Tu Du.pdf, p. 4. Accessed 3 January 2017.

35 David Trujillo, “At Tu Du Hospital, optimism remains high despite challenges,” 12 April 2016, URL: www.peoplesworld.org/article/at-tu-du-hospital-optimism-r…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

36 Dave Lowe and François Jarlov, Caravelle-Saigon: A History, Ho Chi Minh City: VHSG Saigon Culture Publishing House, 2009.

37 Tim Doling, “In Search of Saigon’s American War Vestiges,” Historic Vietnam, 26 April 2015, URL: www.historicvietnam.com/us-vestiges. Accessed 17 July 2017.

38 Natasha Pairaudeau and François Tainturier, “De Saigon à Ho Chi Minh Ville,” op. cit. (note 2), p. 229.

39 In 1976 it came under management by Saigontourist—which manages about a third of the luxury hotels of the city—which in 1986 gave way to a financially independent management. Ibid., p. 229.

40 Ibid., p. 231.

41 Several of Bill Burke’s photographs in Autrefois, maison privée, New York, NY: PowerHouse Books, 2004, show modernist buildings in Phnom Penh with wide curved corners; Michelle Vachon, “Photographer Captures Layers of History at City’s Corners,” Cambodia Daily, 5 October 2015, URL: www.cambodiadaily.com/news/photographer-captures-layers-o…. Accessed 17 July 2017. On modernism in Cambodia see Helen Grant Ross and Darryl Collins, Building Cambodia: “New Khmer Architecture” 1953–1970, Bangkok: The Key Publishers, 2006.

42 “Khởi công xây dựng Cao ốc Artex Saigon,” SGGP official website, 26 May 2005, URL: www.sggp.org.vn/khoi-cong-xay-dung-cao-oc-artex-saigon-33…. Accessed 19 July 2017.

43 “Colliers International chosen to manage tallest building in town,” Vietnam Breaking News, 25 October 2016, URL: m.vietnambreakingnews.com/2016/10/colliers-international-…. Accessed July 17 2017.

44 “Vietnam metro loses 200 historic buildings to development,” Thanh Nien News, 12 April 2014, www.thanhniennews.com/society/vietnam-metro-loses-200-his…. Accessed 17 July 2017.

45 Mike Ives, “Colonial Architecture Fades from Ho Chi Minh City,” op. cit. (note 29); Zanna K. McKay, “Vietnam’s architectural gems are disappearing,” USA Today, 4 March 2017, www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2017/03/04/vietnam-arch…. Accessed 27 July 2017.

——————————

Table des illustrations
Titre Figure 1: Catinat Building, 26 Ly Tu Trong, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 108k
Titre Figure 2: 80 Dong Khoi Street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 148k
Titre Figure 3: Grand Hotel, 8 Dong Khoi street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 144k
Titre Figure 4: “Seaprodex” building, Dong Khoi and Ngo Duc Ke Streets, 2016.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 240k
Titre Figure 5: 2-4-6 Dong Khoi Street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 124k
Titre Figure 6: Hotel Majestic, 1 Dong Khoi Street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-6.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 184k
Titre Figure 7: State Bank of Vietnam, Yersin Street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-7.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 148k
Titre Figure 8: Mekong Housing Bank building, 32 Ham Nghi Street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-8.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 140k
Titre Figure 9: Comptoir Nguyễn-Văn-Hảo Saïgonnais flatiron building, Ky Con Street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-9.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 168k
Titre Figure 10: Clinique St. Paul, 280 Dien Bien Phu, 2015.
Crédits Source : Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-10.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 120k
Titre Figure 11: Từ Dũ Hospital Connecting Bridge, 284 Cong Quynh, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-11.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 136k
Titre Figure 12: Rex Hotel, 141 Nguyễn Huệ Boulevard, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-12.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 112k
Titre Figure 13: The Palace Hotel, 55-56 Nguyen Hue Boulevard, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-13.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 148k
Titre Figure 14: 43 Hai Ba Trung Street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-14.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 136k
Titre Figure 15: A Street in Phnom Penh, 2008.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-15.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 9,6M
Titre Figure 16: 2 Ton That Tung Street, 2015.
Crédits Source: Author΄s picture.
URL journals.openedition.org/abe/docannexe/image/3630/img-16.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 628k
Haut de page
Pour citer cet article
Référence électronique

H. Hazel Hahn, « Rounded Edges: Modernism and Architectural Dialogue in Ho Chi Minh City », ABE Journal [En ligne], 11 | 2017, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2017, consulté le 27 juillet 2018. URL : journals.openedition.org/abe/3630 ; DOI : 10.4000/abe.3630
Haut de page
Auteur
H. Hazel Hahn

Professor of History, Seattle University, Seattle, WA, USA
Haut de page
Droits d’auteur

Licence Creative Commons
La revue ABE Journal est mise à disposition selon les termes de la Licence Creative Commons Attribution – Pas d’Utilisation Commerciale – Pas de Modification 4.0 International.

journals.openedition.org/abe/3630#ftn32

By manhhai on 2018-07-28 10:22:07
tags”;

Keyword density is what we always hear about when talking about content creation and article marketing however it is not the key to search engine ranking by itself. Keyword density used to be king before the search engine algorithms were fully developed and hit with a series of changes. Today the flow of the content and the diversity of these keywords play just as large a role in the search engine rankings, along with how much your content is enjoyed by readers. Readers don’t want to know they are being sold! No one likes a salesman who pushes themselves on you and when you spew out the same keyword 50 times in just a 500 word segment you are going overboard. Read it out loud, does it sound well written? Probably not. Keyword diversity is a much better way to climb search engine rankings and your readers will prefer it as well.The reason we have search engines is to provide the users with content that matches their search. It has to be real content relevant to the search and not simply a bunch of words thrown together. It isn’t a new concept to have diversity in keywords vs. density and now that we have so many millions of websites and search engine choices rising to the top it’s important to realize you can’t cheat anymore. You need real, relevant and helpful content. You need to have keywords that branch out and they can’t just be slammed together; they have to be truly relevant. It’s key to understand that the first step to your website is providing honest, well written content.Providing your target audience with well written content means you have to write it yourself or hire someone to write it. If you plan are hiring a writer, go for experience, not trying to save a buck; the money you save can cost you more in lost sales. Once you have relevant content that is easy to read as well as timely and interesting you have the hardest part done. Now you can go back to whatever it is do you best when it comes to marketing your online products or services. Let your competent article service take care of the keyword diversity. Just make sure they understand what you want, the keywords you prefer, and that your articles need to read naturally.The best way to promote keyword diversity in your content is to start with great content and if your writer doesn’t understand SEO, put in the effort to optimize it for search engines yourself. This will keep your readers happy and your search engine listing high. In turn the frequency of users visiting will only help your ranking rise even higher.

Article Tags:
Keyword Diversity, Search Engine, Well Written

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Let us explode your traffic numbers with Portland search engine optimization.  Visit http://www.bizsuccesscenter.com to see the services that we offer.