How to home school High School on the Road

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When you are some of those fortunate people who have an opportunity to do some globetrotting – potentially for as much as a year – should you be concerned about “losing” the educational time with your home schooling high school student? And how can you keep up in difficult subjects such as math or science?I believe you can not prevent a child from learning. Traveling will teach them huge amounts that you just can’t learn from books! And you realize, unschoolers succeed all the time. How much more can you be able to be successful if you are unschooling all over the globe? Go for it! It will be a great educational fun, as well as an experience not to be skipped! Simply expose your kids to information all during the trip. As you travel, have them read books on each area, and learn a bit of the language. Learn naturally as you go along. The year won’t be lost – it will enrich you and your children, and make them a more fascinating college applicant!I can come up with a few suggestions. If you are going to travel for an extended time, think about taking a math book. If you can encourage your children to be regular with math, it will allow YOU to feel as if the year is not squandered. It’s fairly simple to accumulate three science credits for high school even if you have a year off. Math skills, however, can be lost if they are not used. If you ask them to do a little bit of math every day, it may help them to retain that information. Even when they only do a couple of problems, it can help maintain those skills! When they are doing work at a high school level in math, think about buying an SAT work book, and just doing a few math problems every day.My next suggestion is to bring a journal. Having your children write their experiences each day can help solidify their learning. It will supply regular practice with writing, and provide you a place to record all the things they did and learned. When it comes time for a transcript, you can review those activities, and catalog them into various classes. It will help you calculate the hours spent on each course, which will help you with determining the credit value.

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Find out more regarding high school homeschooling. Visit Thehomescholar.com that consists of precise information on christian homeschool curriculum that may help you to know more on your kid’s education and learning.

tier ranking all the classics i read in high school

comment below your favorite book you read in school and your least fave

i saw a similar video on Kaat’s channel & hers is really good so check her out if you want more required reading tier ranking content: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgxhfS1tcis&t=501s

i hope this video was at least mildly entertaining and helped you get to know me and my reading history a bit better

also the deodorant in the background is killinggggg me but oh well this footage was too good

Edit: I’ve never had a video get this much engagement so like thanks for watching but…. This list is very subjective. I was not trying to be objective or “fair” when curating the list i was just going off my personal feelings that i had while experiencing these stories as a teenager and I haven’t read any of these books in years. If I disliked your favorite book or called it problematic it’s truly not that deep on my part and the book isn’t “cancelled” simply because i disliked it. (Two of the “problematic” books are there simply because sexual violence is a trigger for me)The classics will survive whether i like em or not. Thanks for watching

my links:
my patreon: https://www.patreon.com/minareads
bookstagram https://www.instagram.com/mina_reads/?hl=en
Book twitter https://twitter.com/minareadss
goodreads : https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/56322887-mina-reads

my wishlist: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/SGMLMPPNW7QH?ref_=wl_share